1/4' blueboard question....

andrelaplume2July 18, 2008

Almost time to start to finish the basement. I've been lurking and posted a few times. Ideally, everyone seems to agree, the best way to start is with 1/2" to 2" pink or blue board against the walls and framing over that. Well, the 2" is not affordable where I live, even the half inch (2 X 8 sheet) is $10 a sheet. I saw something else and wondered if it would be acceptable. Its 1/4" folded (acordian style) blueboard. 48" X 50'. Would this be acceptable? I'd glue it up first and then frame over it then add fiberglass insulation.

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iowascrapper

I work for Service Master and with the floods here in Iowa have had to tear out ALOT of basements this year. There has been quite a few that had styrofoam behind the sheetrock/paneling for insulation. Would be cheap. Also plastic.
Trish

    Bookmark   July 18, 2008 at 1:56AM
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andrelaplume2

the general recomendation on this forum is to put 1/2" or more board up first rather than framing against the concrete. It is NOT cheap at all. 1/2" blue board has an R5 value and it sold by me for $10 for a 2 X 8 sheet. It appears some sort of board or styrafoam should be used. I am wonderinf if this 1/4" stuff is acceptable?

    Bookmark   July 18, 2008 at 10:10AM
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mike_kaiser_gw

I'm trying to understand what purpose a 1/4" of insulation would serve.

I'd tell you to frame in a traditional manner, holding the wall back a bit from the foundation. Insulate with fiberglass and then drywall. The result is much better looking wall that's flat and plumb.

    Bookmark   July 20, 2008 at 8:58AM
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andrelaplume2

based on what I have read here you never want to construct without some sort of pink or blue board up first to prevent water seepage and mold.

    Bookmark   July 20, 2008 at 11:31PM
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mike_kaiser_gw

based on what I have read here you never want to construct without some sort of pink or blue board up first to prevent water seepage and mold.

Water should be addressed before even starting a basement finishing project. Quite frankly I don't see a thin layer of Styrofoam stopping water.

As I said, I typically hold the wall back a bit, creating an air space. If there is very minor water, there's an air space for evaporation. If it becomes a bigger problem then pieces of drywall can be neatly removed to repair the problem and then patched back in.

    Bookmark   July 21, 2008 at 6:33AM
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andrelaplume2

your procedure sounds good too me but like I said, I have seen numerous posts advising that the 'modern' way of finishing requires the pink board. However, maybe I just had a bad run of posts earlier this year with some confusion or misinformation...especially sice I am not hearing the other side of the story. Your method is certainly easier and less expensive.

    Bookmark   July 21, 2008 at 11:09AM
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    Bookmark   July 21, 2008 at 11:10AM
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worthy

The minimum width XPS mentioned by Building Science for use on a basement interior is .75".

Permanently effective building methods are not a matter of voting, but of building science, which is what Building Science and the DREE are all about.

As a builder/renovator for 20 years, I am sure that if I ripped apart some of the basements I built to Code in the past I'd be appalled. My personal homes were done the same way. I never noticed a mould problem. But I also run a dehumidifier 12 months a year.

EPS is also effective, but cheaper than XPS. On a home I built last year, I used 1" XPS on the exterior, which ran about C$6 per 2'x8' sheet from a commercial yard.

Here is a link that might be useful: Basement Insulation Systems

    Bookmark   July 21, 2008 at 4:25PM
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worthy

Whoops! I meant EERE.

Here is a link that might be useful: US Dept. of Energy-- Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    Bookmark   July 21, 2008 at 6:46PM
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andrelaplume2

Yea, I am just torn between what is recommended today...which adds a great deal to the price and robs the room of a few inches...and....what worked for years. Perhaps if you ripped apart old homes you would provide home, perhaps not. I have never known anyone to have trouble. I too run a dehumidifier. Its never damp either.

I am trying to whats best within reason. Posts suggested the .5" board, now I find that that may be unacceptable. I was hoping the 1/4 stuff would protect from the mold etc.

Someone asked somewhere...this is to be used on the inside of an existing 20 year old poured concrete basement.

    Bookmark   July 22, 2008 at 1:40PM
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