skim coating with hydraulic cement

civ_IV_fanApril 28, 2011

so, i have this one section of one wall in my basement where water seeps through, it is about six square feet. water only comes through in periods where it has been raining for several days and even then it isn't much water. the wall had been sealed with white paint (drylok?) but it was flaking off. i scraped off all the flaking paint and skim coated the whole area with a mixture of quick-setting hydraulic cement. so far, this solution is working really well, plus being lime based it should breathe somewhat, which seems better than sealing everything in. but, i've become worried because this is not really a listed use of hydraulic cement. i'm wondering if anyone else has used this cement in this way - as a spot skim coating.

basement walls are poured, BTW, the house is 90 years old.

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worthy

this is not really a listed use of hydraulic cement.

Depends on the exact product. There are hydraulic cement mixes that are specifically designed for skim-coat repairs (See link for one.)

In any case, the best way to cure water problems is from the outside. Look to the usual suspects--reverse grading of surrounding soil, drives and walkways, leaking eaves, broken downspouts and water discharge too close to the home.

Next time there's a downpour, go outside and take a look.

Here is a link that might be useful: Rapid Set Skim Coat

    Bookmark   April 28, 2011 at 12:12PM
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civ_IV_fan

worthy - the prior owners deeply edged (between the grass and foundation plantings) about five feet out from the south wall of the house such that even though the water runs downhill from the foundation, it pools up at the spot of the edging. also, i have noticed standing water collecting where my eave drains, which is about ten feet out from the front (west wall) of the house. the water problem is all the way at the front of the southern wall, so more or less in the southwest corner. hopefully that made sense.

i have been told there is a french drain near the southern wall of the house. what is the best way to locate this drain?

    Bookmark   April 29, 2011 at 7:48AM
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brickeyee

"...even though the water runs downhill from the foundation, it pools up at the spot of the edging."

Fill back in to raise the grade for better drainage so the water is further from the house.

    Bookmark   April 29, 2011 at 11:32AM
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worthy

i have been told there is a french drain near the southern wall of the house. what is the best way to locate this drain?

It should run to daylight, a drywell or to a sump in the basement. But over the years, homeowners and amateur drainage guys may have put in all kinds of cockamanie things.

A neat way to be rid of roof runoff is to extend the drains underground. See link below. Depending on the soil conditions, your lot and municipal regulations, you can then run the lines to daylight, a drywell, city storms or spread it around your property by using perforated piping. In my municipality you must dispose of all runoff only on your own lot.

Here is a link that might be useful: How to Extend a Downspout

    Bookmark   April 30, 2011 at 3:38AM
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