Old lamp -- hand painted

firstwordmanMarch 16, 2011

Could anyone tell me about this old lamp? I can't find any markings on it except for on (what was) the wick adjustment knob, and it only says Made in the US of America. It stands 24' tall. The base and the globe are hand painted.

I put more pictures at www.cornbreadcreek.com

Here is a link that might be useful: cornbreadcreek

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lindac

Link doesn't work.....
Where did you get it? It's rarer than hens' teeth to find one of them that is old and the top and bottom match....and your's appears to....which makes me suspicious that it's ar epro.

    Bookmark   March 16, 2011 at 8:48PM
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firstwordman

Hi Linda,

The link should work. It works when I click it anyway.

I got it from a small thrift store that is run by an Episcopalian church. It's a small shop that not too many folks know about and many of their donations come from the estates of church members. It's run by volunteers. There are about a dozen or so that volunteer and a couple of them work each day. It's a great place but it's only open Wed - Sat for a 5 hours each day :)

Here is a link that might be useful: cornbreadcreek

    Bookmark   March 16, 2011 at 9:08PM
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calliope

Where is the switching device to turn the current off and on?

    Bookmark   March 16, 2011 at 10:20PM
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lindac

Link worked this time....
How does the cord exit the bottom?
What do you find when you unscrew the cap on the place where the fuel should go?
Did you look closely? are there any initials on the hand painted parts?
It's type was called a "Gone with the Wind" lamp....don't know why.
If it's all as it appears....and it has been "passivly electrofied....it's a very nice lamp!
1880's to 1900...

    Bookmark   March 16, 2011 at 10:47PM
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firstwordman

Hi Linda,

I'm attaching pictures of what appears could be a signature/mark on the base and the globe. They're made to look like part of the vines but are different than the others. The switch is just a brass button that has been attached from underneath. It's sticking through one of the open spaces. No hole was drilled.

The glass is pretty heavy. I don't believe a reproduction would use glass as thick but I can't say for sure.
I've also added these pictures to the web link.

Here is a link that might be useful: cornbreadcreek

    Bookmark   March 17, 2011 at 12:31AM
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lindac

I don't think that's a signature....but I do think it's old...probably not 1880.....more like 1900.
Some later ones were originally made electric to look like oil lamps but never were....some good old oil lamps have been ruined by being made electric....your's appears to be oil, old, hand painted and the top and bottom match.
Nice lamp!!
Linda C

    Bookmark   March 17, 2011 at 12:54AM
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calliope

That's why I asked about the switch, and I'm glad you did a reverse on that first remark Linda because I didn't see any indication it was a reproduction. What tipped me off was the integrity of the wick knob. If it operated a switch, I'd have been concerned because that's how it's often done in reproductions. In original old GWTW lamps, the bottom globe would have held a metal reservoir, usually removable, so an opening in the bottom is possible on an original and not necessarily a tip-off it's a reproduction. I can't look at this picture and say for sure it's authentic but I would not assume immediately it isn't.

The electrification adaptor kits often replace the entire metal wick assembly, and often have two wires, so no drilling is necessary to the bottom fount and the switch would have been external. Had that been the case, I'd have said immediately it's old. But, you can also convert them by gutting out the wick holder and wiring traditionally if there is a hole in the fount or bottom globe.

Since there is an indication it may be authentically old, it would warrant a trip to a dealer for an in-person evaluation.

    Bookmark   March 17, 2011 at 10:30AM
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firstwordman

I'm attaching pictures of the wiring on underside of the old wick assembly, as well as the wick knob. When you turn the knob, there is a small rod with a round ball end that moves up and down accordingly. What purpose would that have served? Would it be there to possibly indicate the amount of wick left before needing replacement? Also, the cap where the lamp oil would have been poured still screws on and off. Are these things an indicator as to whether the lamp is original or a repro? If it's original, the chances of my sister-in-law getting it as a gift are considerably less than they would be otherwise....

I love this site. Thank y'all :-)

Here is a link that might be useful: cornbreadcreek

    Bookmark   March 17, 2011 at 11:06AM
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lindac

the knob adjusts the height of the wick....and the height of the flame. The fact that there is an actual fuel font that you can fill pretty well seals the fact that it's an old oil lamp electrified.
Your poor SIL!!!

    Bookmark   March 17, 2011 at 11:18AM
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calliope

LOL..........oh yeah.

    Bookmark   March 17, 2011 at 5:21PM
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